janet fisher~writer

Following strong women through history

New Blog, New Story

Hello, and welcome to my new blog. I write books, using the ancient art of storytelling to offer a glimpse into other lives, both real and imagined, following strong women through history to inspire today’s women to be all that we are.

In this blog I’ll talk about writing, about history and the women who live it, and about the people and places they love. Or whatever else strikes my fancy.

My focus now is my newest book, Two Women Across Time: A Pioneer’s Dream to Keep. Four years ago when I took over the farm that’s been in my family since my great-great grandmother bought it in 1868, I knew I wanted to write our unique story. A woman bought this farm for the family. Now another woman in the family owns and operates the place. It’s one of the few Century Farms in Oregon named for a woman. Having another woman owner, bracketing the generations, makes our story even more unusual.

I grew up on this farm, hearing about my pioneer ancestors who crossed the plains to Oregon in the days of the great westward migration in this country. My sister and I would act out pioneer stories in play, but I usually assumed the role of a man—or his horse. These lives seemed much more vital somehow than those of the women. I didn’t realize we had a role model for women in our own pioneer family.

I don’t remember when I learned that Martha had bought this family farm on the Oregon frontier after her husband was killed. Sometime in the late 1960s or early 1970s my parents set a plaque on their dining room buffet declaring the “Martha A. Maupin Farm” a Century Farm. I took a certain pride in knowing it was named for a woman, but I still didn’t know her story. I knew her husband Garrett was killed while hauling freight when a wagon full of wool overturned and smothered him, and I knew their oldest son Cap, only eleven years old at the time, was driving the wagon. That’s about it.

Meanwhile, others in the family were searching, digging through courthouses and gleaning information from old-timers. Another thing was happening in the country. The women’s movement prompted others to seek out stories of women. The West’s great story of the bold pioneer crossing a continent had already been told and told. How brave the men, how great their challenges. Now researchers and writers were turning their focus to the women who followed those men into this glorious wilderness. Women faced their own challenges and showed great bravery themselves.

Thanks to the work of cousins and strangers, the framework for Martha’s story was emerging before I began my own search. Shortly after moving to the farm I sat at my computer and googled her name, not really expecting to find anything. How thrilling when sites popped up with her name in bold. I also found books about westering women, as well as a series of books presenting diaries of women on the Oregon Trail, and more. Great resources. I connected with cousins I’d never met, including a third cousin, Linda Maupin Noel, another of Martha’s great-great granddaughters, who lives just forty miles away. She had dug out documents with information none of the family seemed to be aware of, and she generously passed along reams of information.

With so much at my fingertips I began to get a picture of Martha in my mind. But to write the book I wanted to see through her eyes, walk in her shoes. To do that I chose to present her scenes in fictional form, while wrapping my own segments around hers in simple narrative. Though I have a journalism background, I’ve been writing novels for several years, so I used that experience to fill in the gaps I couldn’t possibly know. Her story took hold of me and carried me with her on that heroine’s journey to this farm, impacting me more than I ever expected.

The book is complete. This and a few more of my stories are highlighted on the “Books” page of my website. I’ve been pitching Two Women Across Time to agents and editors, gaining interest, and will hopefully make a connection soon to have it published and available to readers. Then, either through traditional publishing or one of many other publishing options available today, the others will follow.

I’ll keep readers updated on this blog. Thank you for stopping by. Please come back again sometime. I’d love to hear from you.

COMMENTS

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16 Comments

  1. Linda Maupin Noel

    I’m so glad you’ve got this blog going. I’ve shared it with my Maupin family and hope they check it out. I’m very excited about your progress. Linda

    • Thank you, Linda. I really appreciate your support.

  2. Janet, a very attractive and well-done site. I will follow your blog and will look forward to reading your posts. Your book about a pioneer woman is the type of family history I love to read.

    • Thank you, Olivia. I appreciate your comment.

  3. Hello, My name is Suzy Maupin, I am Clyde H. Maupin’s only daughter,and Linda Maupin Noel’s cousin. Her father Howard and my father Clyde were brothers. I am very much interested in obtaining at least 4 (four) books once completed. One for myself and one for each one of my sons. THANK YOU so much for writing the book.

    • Hi Suzy! I’m so glad to hear from you and to meet another cousin through this blog. Thank you for commenting and expressing an interest in the book. Please check in once in a while to see how things are progressing. At best we’re probably a good year out from publication. I will try to keep track of your request, but please remind me when the time gets closer. Hopefully we can meet in person one day.

  4. Mary Cooley

    Nice blog, Janet!! Ed and I are thrilled to be part of the history of the farm, and we look forward to seeing your book in print!

    • Thank you, Mary. I’m glad you’re here. For readers who haven’t met Mary and Ed, they rent pasture and run grass-fed cattle on the farm. Ed had worked with my dad since the 70s and knows more about how things work on the place than I ever will. He’s one good reason my dad was able to keep running the farm into his late years, and one good reason I dared try it myself.

  5. Sami

    Hi Janet!

    Very nice website–and photographs (I really miss Robin’s work around here). Having read portions of two or three of your novels or other work, I sincerely recommend your writing to anyone viewing this blog. Onward!

    • Sami! Great to hear from you. I appreciate your recommendation. I’m sure you folks from Montana do miss Robin’s work. He worked there for quite a while before moving to Oregon to be a part of our farming venture. A click on his name under the pictures will take you to his website, and a click on his name on the Blogroll will take you straight to his blog, where you’ll find lots more of his wonderful pictures.

  6. Fascinating story! Best of luck in finding a publisher! Hope it happens soon for you! Nice blog and website!

    • Thank you, heidiwriter. I appreciate your comment.

  7. Amanda Pfantz

    Hi Janet!! I promise I’ll send you a proper email soon with updates but… Glad you are doing well and your website and blog look AMAZING! Great photography from your son-in-law–I’m a little envious :)! I learned a few new things about you too (didn’t know you taught writing! Very neat and somehow doesn’t surprise me). Best of luck with your submissions (can’t wait until I can buy a copy of your book!) and I’ll be in touch with you soon.

    • Thanks, Amanda. Good to hear from you. I appreciate all your good thoughts on the website and blog. It was actually kind of fun to put it together–well, for me anyway. My kids did all the hard work on it.

  8. Bunny Mode

    You’ve done an excellent job on your blog. I can hardly wait to read your book.

    • Looking forward to that day myself. 🙂

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