janet fisher~writer

Following strong women through history

Tag Archives: storytelling

Leaping off the Page

My fiction turned real a few days ago when I was working on a bull-leaping scene for my book of ancient Crete, trying to give the work more dazzle with yet one more edit. The Cretans did leap bulls with long, sharp horns back in 1470 BC, and they painted frescoes to illustrate it, like …

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Going Home Again

Who says you can’t go home again? Well, some of us do return, and my friend A. Lynn Ash writes about that in her new book Eugeneana. Born in Eugene, Oregon, Lynn grew up there in a home over the grocery store pictured on the book cover. Then she left. Eugeneana is a story of …

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Fort Umpqua Post Script

So, what if history got it wrong? After last week’s rollicking Fort Umpqua Days celebration, I take a long look at our sturdy reconstructed fort on the Umpqua River in Elkton, Oregon, and I recall a question from one of the customers who came by my book-selling booth during the event. “Is Fort Umpqua in …

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Author Gala Reading

The annual Mid-Valley Willamette Writers Author Celebration happens next week when several members are selected to read from their published works. I’m excited to be one of the readers again. At this year’s event I’ll be reading from my new historical novel, The Shifting Winds. Pulling up some pleasant memories, here’s the group that read …

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Stories of Story

I spoke at the Roseburg Rotary Club meeting last night. They invited me to talk about my new book The Shifting Winds, and when I began putting together my speech for this I struggled a bit. What could I say in 20 minutes to give the essence of this full-length novel and still entertain an …

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Headed for Tsunami Sunday

We’re headed for Tsunami on Sunday for my Eugene launch of The Shifting Winds. The store’s banner, caught in the late afternoon light, speaks of a storm of waves rushing fast against a vivid sky. And I guess that’s the hope for every book. May it create its own waves, bringing readers into a world …

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